Lower Intake Gasket???????


What can cause a lower intake gasket to go out on a car? My brothers car was just looked at by the shop, and it was determined the lower intake is going out on it. It is a 2003 Chevy malibu, with about 82000 miles im guessing….. Also we had another car, a 2000 pontiac grand am and that intake went out 2 times,…

Engine size? Either 3.1 or 3.4. At any rate, the material used to make the lower intake gasket was not able to withstand the chemical reaction of dex cool antifreeze used in GM engines from the late 90’s to early 2000’s. Quite the common repair for all GM makes and models with those engines. All gasket kits have been updated and outlast the o.e. ones. Replace them often, including my 2001 Pontiac i recently serviced

It was a common problem on the newer 3400 and 3500 SFI V6’s they basically took a 3100 SFI V6 and bored and stroked it out to 3.4L and 3.5L they also changed the intake manifold they just maid the ports bigger but didn’t add more material to the out side of the port so as a result the gasket has less surface aria so it makes it harder to seal. If its not done right the first time than the problem will keep happening. Fell Pro makes a gasket set for those engines that will fix the problem. Also with the Dexacool coolant if you mix that coolant with anything else than the coolant will turn into an acid and eat away at the gaskets. most cars today have coolants that are specific to the brand for example VW BMW GM Toyota ex all have specific coolants and if you mix in the green coolant with these it will cause problems down the road.

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RE:
Lower Intake Gasket???????
What can cause a lower intake gasket to go out on a car? My brothers car was just looked at by the shop, and it was determined the lower intake is going out on it. It is a 2003 Chevy malibu, with about 82000 miles im guessing….. Also we had another car, a 2000 pontiac grand am and that intake…

This is typical, not just for the GM products but Chrysler & Ford too. They just don’t build cars like they use to. Now we have small engines that generate a lot of heat because they have to run at higher RPM’s longer to generate the horse power. They use ALUMINIUM for the blocks & heads more often which just doesn’t stand the heat like cast iron causing warping & gasket problems (again it is to help the little engines produce useful power by reducing weight). Today’s cars are just vastly over-priced, over-engineered junk. A 440 or 400 Dodge V-8 from the 70’s would go at least 140,000 without any major troubles (then you could just bet the a lobe on the Cam shaft would wear off soon). Sure these engines used more gas but in the long run they would be cheaper for the consumer & more reliable.

some mechanics are not very honest.
older cars pre 84 had a carburetor and the gasket under the carb. was the upper and the gasket under the intake manifold was the lower.
those were usually made of cast iron and very seldom warped enough to leak. the newer cars are fuel injected with an aluminum air intake plenum that could possibly leak air which would give an improper air fuel ratio mixture. this seldom happens and is not that hard to change the gasket.the bottom of the plenum should be checked for warping and torqued correctly when installed.

Almost any of the GM 3.X engines will do this eventually. One common site for them to leak is where the EGR tube passes through the head. This tube heats up and can melt the gasket. Also Dexcool turns acidic over time period, whether you add other coolants to it or not. GM finally admitted this and there is a settlement out now for you to get a partial refund for any repairs done to the intake manifold gaskets.

GM had problems with the 2.8, 3.1, and 3.4 six cylinder engine blowing intake gaskets for some reason, you would think that as long as those engines have been out that someone would have found a gasket that will work and not keep blowing out by now.

Not unusual for these engines – I replace them quite often.
The reason is up for debate, but there’s no debating that it seems to be the weak link in these engines.

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